I want to talk about learning. But not the lifeless, sterile, futile, quickly forgotten stuff..

Yesterday I came across the following quote via Infed.org. I need to read more Carl Rogers work after my doctorate – I feel completely high when I read these views of learning – The freedom that learning can be, the curiosity that it should be, the love for life and being in the world that learning is. Learning is an embodied life-giving  experience, it is lifeforce. Often I forget this when I am talking about important but more formal curriculum planning like constructive alignment to academics, but I hope in formal curriculum we can aim to keep this sense of discovery and joy alive for students.

I want to talk about learning. But not the lifeless, sterile, futile, quickly forgotten stuff that is crammed into the mind of the poor helpless individual tied into his seat by ironclad bonds  of conformity! I am talking about LEARNING – the insatiable curiosity that drives the adolescent boy to absorb everything he can see or hear or read about gasoline engines in order to improve the efficiency and speed of his ‘cruiser’. I am talking about the student who says, “I am discovering, drawing in from the outside, and making that which is drawn in a real part of me.” I am talking about any learning in which the experience of the learner progresses along this line: “No, no, that’s not what I want”; “Wait! This is closer to what I am interested in, what I need”; “Ah, here it is! Now I’m grasping and comprehending what I need and what I want to know!” Carl Rogers 1983: 18-19

 

Accessed on http://infed.org/mobi/learning-theory-models-product-and-process/ 17th Dec 2015

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About Muireann O'Keeffe

I am an educational developer currently working at DCU. I have a passion for researching and evaluating technology that can support and enhance learning. In the past I have taught on Masters programmes (Msc Applied elearning & Postgraduate Diploma in Third level Learning and Teaching) as well as Leadership development programmes.
This entry was posted in curiosity, education, learning, participation and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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